Three things you can do to get your kid reading

49th shelf logoIf you’re not familiar with 49th Shelf, get yerself on over there and check it out. It’s a terrific website that promotes Canadian literature.

They were kind enough to let me publish a guest post this week. Please take a look at my article, which talks about three things – just three – you can do to help instill a love of reading in your child.

Here’s the article on 49th Shelf.

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My first reading of GABBY – to JK/SKs

Gabby_coverI am reading GABBY at Word on the Street this Sunday. It’s my first public book reading… ever. So naturally, I’m a bit nervous. And, naturally, I wanted to try the book out with some kids first in a smaller setting to see what I might need to tweak.

Hillcrest school was kind enough to lend me a lovely JK/SK class for 20 minutes or so. (Thank you to the teachers and the principal for setting that up!)

Here’s what I learned:

  • When you offer some kids a fabric letter to hold, you’d better have something for the other kids to hold, too. Preferably, the first letter of their name. (Or they may throw a letter at you. At your head. And have to apologize later.)
  • At the beginning of the school year, some JK kids are very young. Not everyone will know all the letters, or the sounds they make.
  • Once you’ve finished reading the book, you’d better have used up all your time… or have something else up your sleeve. The kids all turn their eyes on you and… crickets. I had to think fast! (We talked about the first letters of the children’s names.)
  • It’s great to have a “crisis” in your book. The principal suggested that I ask the kids “What will Gabby do?” And it really worked! The kids came up with some great ideas. (Where the heck were they when I was writing the book!?)
  • If your protagonist conjures up a fish for the cat to eat… it’s probably best not to dwell too much on the cute little fish.
  • Teachers are fantastic in terms of giving you feedback and ideas for next time. Thank you, Laura, Nancy and Jon!
  • If your book ends with a word like PILLOW, you’d better make two fabric Ls. (And fast, before Sunday!)

Wish me luck!

 

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Stuffed letters–great for literacy

Letters for Gabby

These fabric letters will be used during my book readings. Tactile letters of any kind are great for young readers to help them connect with words.

Just finished sewing some stuffed fabric letters that I’ll use as props when I do book readings for Gabby.

A local wedding dress designer donated some fabric (including some raw silk – check out the J!) and my friend Jane is helping me stuff the letters; I still need a few more.

They’ll be fun for kids to throw around and put together into words, just like Gabby does.

Playing with letters–whether they’re Scrabble tiles, letter dice like the ones in Jr. Boggle or these stuffed letters–gets kids interacting with words and is a great first step in the literacy process.

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